5K treadmill training schedule

Whether you’re in unfavorable weather, a busy schedule, or a situation that forces your treadmill for most of your training, you can train strong 5K performance indoors. 

This 5K schedule (see below) is designed for 5K runners to perform most or all of their treadmill training. 

Even if you are not training 5K, this schedule is a fun and motivating way to train freezing or cold months.

To start this 8-week itinerary, you need to be making about 10 miles a week. ( If you are a beginner with a 6-week distance of 5K, use the 6-week beginner 5K training schedule .

If you are an advanced runner, use this 4-week advanced 5K training schedule .) Fairly new to treadmill running, this tip for treadmill running the check-out.

This 5K schedule incorporates several workouts during training to avoid boredom with your treadmill routine. 

You can move your workouts to accommodate your personal schedule, but don’t do long or hard workouts for two days in a row.

Below is a description of the different treadmill runs to be performed during 5K training.

  • Hill Repetition: Planning a treadmill is simple because hill workouts give you precise control over how steep and far the hill is. Even if you’re going for a flat 5K race, you can benefit from a hill training workout as it helps build strength, speed, and confidence. To do hill repetitions after warming up, increase the slope for a specified amount of time, then recover for a specified interval. Repeat the hill/recovery for the shower amount.

  • Sprint Interval: Start with a 5-minute walk or an easy jog. Choose your pace with hard effort (heavy breathing) for 30 seconds. Easily recover 90 seconds of jogging. Repeat the sprint/recovery interval with the specified amount (8x, 9x, etc.). End with a 5-minute cooldown from an easy paced jogging or brisk walk. You’ll probably start sweating pretty quickly, so get a towel ready for this workout!

  • Pyramid Workout: After 5 minutes warm up, run at the target 5K race speed for 1 minute and recover 1 minute. 2 minutes hard, 2 minutes recovery; Run hard for 3 minutes and recover 3 minutes until you reach the “top” of the pyramid. Then go back down the “pyramid” and run hard for 3 minutes and recover 3 minutes. End your workout with a 5 minute cooldown.

  • Long-Distance Run (LR) and Easy Pace (EP) Run: While you’re not learning long distance runs, long runs and easy pace runs help you develop vital stamina in 5K races. You need to run long distances and easy pace at a comfortable and interactive pace. Breathe easily and speak in complete sentences. If you are breathing hard, you are running too fast. Take it slow or take a walk.

  • Cross Training (CT): Cross training (CT) can be any activity you enjoy (except running), including biking, swimming, elliptical trainer, strength training, yoga, etc. Cross-training work helps treadmill runners break the monotony of running indoors, so even if they love running on a treadmill, they will want to blend their weekly schedule with other activities.

  • Strength training offers many benefits to runners and is an excellent cross-training option. You should do at least daily strength training per week. Two days per week is better. Strengthening exercises don’t have to be too intense. You can do without weights or machines like this sample workout you can do while watching TV. With just 10 minutes of strength training twice a week, you’ll find that running makes a difference.

  • Rest days: On days off, you can take a day off or do simple cross-training (CT).

8 week 5K treadmill schedule

Week 1:

Day 1 : 40 min CT or rest
Day 2 : Hill repetition: 10 min EP, [2 min @ 3.0 slope, 1 min @ 1.0 slope] x 3, 10 min EP
Day 3 : 30 min CT or rest
Day 4: Sprint interval : Warm up for 5 minutes; [Effort 30 seconds / Easy pace 90 seconds] x 8; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest Day
6 : 4 Miles LR
Day 7 : 2 Miles EP

Week 2:

Day 1 : 40 minutes CT or rest
Day 2 : Hill repetition: 10 minutes EP, [2 minutes @ 3.0 slope, 1 minute @ 1.0 slope] x 4, 10 minutes EP
Day 3 : 30 minutes CT or rest
Day 4 : Sprint interval : Warm up for 5 minutes; [Effort 30 seconds / Easy pace 90 seconds] x 9; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest
Day 6 : 7 miles LR
Day 7 : 3 miles EP

Week 3:

Day 1 : 40 min CT or rest
Day 2 : Sprint interval: 5 min warm-up; [Effort 30 seconds / Easy pace 90 seconds] x 8; 5 min cooldown
Day 3 : 30 min CT or rest
Day 4 : Pyramid exercise: 5 min warm up; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest Day
6 : 6 miles LR
Day 7 : 3 miles EP

Week 4:

Day 1 : 40 min CT or rest
Day 2 : Hill repetition: 10 min EP, [2 min @ 3.5 slope, 1 min @ 1.0 slope] x 2; [2 min @ 4.5 slope, 1 min @ 1.0 slope] x 2; 10 min EP
Day 3 : 30 min CT or rest
Day 4 : Sprint Interval: 5 min warm-up; [Effort 30 seconds / Easy pace 90 seconds] x 10; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest
Week 6 : 7 miles LR
Day 7 : 3 miles EP

Day 5:

Day 1 : 40 min CT or rest
Day 2 : Sprint interval: [30 sec labor / 90 sec feeding] x 9
Day 3 : 30 min CT or rest
Day 4 : Pyramid exercise: 5 min warm-up; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest Day
6 : 6 miles LR
Day 7 : 3 miles EP

Week 6:

Day 1 : 40 minutes CT or rest
Day 2 : Hill repetition: 10 minutes EP, [2 minutes @ 3.5 slope, 1 minute @ 1.0 slope] x 5, 10 minutes EP
Day 3 : 30 minutes CT or rest
Day 4 : Pyramid exercise : Warm up for 5 minutes; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest Day
6 : 6 miles LR
Day 7 : 3 miles EP

Week 7:

Day 1 : 40 min CT or rest
Day 2 : Sprint interval: 5 min warm-up; [Effort 30 seconds / Easy pace 90 seconds] x 8; 5 min cooldown
Day 3 : 30 min CT or rest
Day 4 : Pyramid exercise: 5 min warm up; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 3 minutes @ 5K speed, 3 minutes easy; 2 minutes @ 5K speed, 2 minutes easy; 1 minute @ 5K speed, 1 minute easy; 5 minute cooldown
Day 5 : Rest Day
6 : 6 miles LR
Day 7 : 3 miles EP

Week 8:

Day 1 : 30 min CT
Day 2 : Rest
Day 3 : 1 EP @ EP; @ 1 mile at 5K speed; 1 Mile @ EP
Day 4 : Rest
Day 5 : 3 Miles EP
Day 6 : Rest
Day 7 : 5K Race!

Race day preparation

Whether this is your first 5K race or you are a racing veteran, it’s important to think about and prepare for your race. Get tips on what to do the day before the 5K race and find out how to avoid 5K race mistakes . If you are unsure if you should do before a race in here to get some tips and ideas please .

One thing to keep in mind about treadmill training in outdoor races is that the treadmill running on the treadmill may not be suitable for the weather conditions during the race. For example, if you are exercising indoors in shorts and tank tops in the cold winter, you may need to wear different clothes for the race. The advice of “nothing new during the race” applies here. Be sure to try out your racing outfit during training at least once before the race starts, so make sure that nothing surprises happen during the race (e.g. chipping , wardrobe malfunction, etc.).

One word

Racing training on a treadmill can be mentally tough, but it also presents some physical challenges for road racing. Compared to outdoor running, treadmill running feels physically easier because the land is pulled under your feet and does not resist wind. Running outside demands more from your body. Because you are walking by pulling your body forward. On the treadmill, the smaller stabilizer muscles in your lower legs don’t have to work hard. Some runners know that calf muscle pain, shin splints , Achilles tendinitis, and other problems are experienced when going out after running exclusively on a treadmill for months .

If you’re doing most of your training on a treadmill, you should once again pay attention to running outdoors on a regular basis. 5K racing is great to run on the road, but going out exclusively doesn’t make a drastic transition. Always start a short run on the road once or twice a week before starting to run outside. Do not forget to straighten the calf, especially after running.

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